Effective Online Writing

Mitchell S. Jackson’s article The “I Do” Addiction is an informal but effective piece of writing. It was very easy imagining him writing this, at this computer going through all of these memories while typing away. Jackson wrote this in such a way where I was captured within the first two sentences. I wanted to keep reading, the words he was using to describe elements of a room or characteristics of a human were so unusual to me that I wanted to know more. 

This article was about his mom and his addiction to crack and how it evolved. How he watched his mother get swept off her feet by it and how he then eventually joined her. He then started selling dope and one night his mother begged him for some and he said no. That’s when he realized it needed to come to an end.

He uses marriage as a way to describe addiction and he is was able to teach me about the human brain while using marriage terminology. “If I could return to the night of her nuptials, I would caution her about the fugitive joy, the plunge, and the ultimate damage the substance that was her groom would do to her orbital frontal cortex, the part of her brain that decides the salience of a stimulus – harm that she couldn’t undo. Bet she’d’ve turned runaway bride if she’d known how restless it would make her feel, how paranoid. Or that her groom might give her a stroke or stop her heart. How a weekend getaway with it could waste her from her normal slim to gaunt”

Jackson’s writing was so simple, which is part of the reason it was so good. I felt as if I was holding my breath reading this, because it was so intense. The best element of this article is his storytelling, he is able to make the reader feel as if they are there with him watching these experiences and memories happen.

He had the ability to be able to write the way he would speak. There were some sentences where I could hear him saying these things in an interview or a conversation. Jackson kept me engaged the entire time with the way his story was written. He jumped back and forth in time throughout the article, for pieces of the story that needed just a little bit more context.

Below is the article if you want to read it!

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/the-i-do-of-addiction


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